Father of the Internet, Sir Tim Berners-Lee Says Web 3.0 Doesn’t Need Blockchain Technology

Tim Berners-Lee Says Web 3.0 Doesn’t Need Blockchain Technology

Sir Tim Berners-Lee, the father of the internet, is credited with creating the World Wide Web. He recently said that blockchain technology is not required to create the decentralized internet he intends to create with his Solid project.

Sir Tim Berners-Lee claimed that blockchain is not necessary for the decentralized internet he wants to promote at one of The Next Web website's recent conferences. He has his own ideas for how the web will be replaced, including a decentralized design that provides consumers access to their data.

Berners-Lee has long contended that his own invention, the WWW, needs to be decentralized. Because of this, when asked if Web 3.0 satisfies his requirements during The Next Web conferences, he responded with a short but emphatic "nope."


Project Solid Berners' aspirations for the Father of the Internet Lee has been working on "Project Solid" for a while. Web 3.0 is based on blockchain, yet it is still constructed with traditional web tools and open specs.

Private data is kept in decentralized data stores, or "pods," under Berners-idea. Lee's The user can host them wherever they choose. After that, users can decide which apps have access to their data. The goal of this project is to provide privacy, interoperability, speed, and scalability.

Father of the Internet: Ambitions for Project Solid

Father of the Internet Lee has been working on "Project Solid" for a while. Web 3.0 is based on blockchain, yet it is still constructed with traditional web tools and open specs.

Private data is kept in decentralized data stores, or "pods," under Berners-idea. Lee's The user can host them wherever they choose. After that, users can decide which apps have access to their data. The goal of this project is to provide privacy, interoperability, speed, and scalability.

He said, “When you try to build those things on the blockchain, it just doesn’t work.”

Tim Berners-Lee in a conference
Image Source: Wikipedia

Berners-Lee claims that Solid has two separate goals. The first is to stop businesses from exploiting user data for things like manipulating elections and creating clickbait. The second is to offer chances for people to profit from our knowledge.

For instance, trusted services might share health information in this way to further medical research and enhance our care.

“I wanted to be able to solve problems when part of the solution is in my head and part of the solution is in yours, and you are on the other side of the planet, both connected to the internet. This is what I wanted for the WWW. It became more of a means to publish content, but all is not lost.”

Road to Web 3.0

Tim Berners-Lee is not new to the world of cryptocurrencies. An NFT containing the original World Wide Web source code was sold for $5.43 million in July 2021.

The NFT being auctioned includes the original time-stamped documents that its creator, Tim Berners-Lee, created in 1989 while working at CERN. The business deemed Berners-proposal Lee's to be too nebulous to move forward with.

Berners-Lee wrote the implementation of three languages and protocols by himself despite the fact that CERN rejected it. 9,555 lines of code would ultimately create the internet.